Vera Lutter documents LACMA before $600-million makeover

Every now and again artists are in the right position to participate and contribute in a pivotal moment of a museum’s history. Vera Lutter (class of 1995) is transitioning through such a moment as she partakes in the year-long artist-in-residence tenure at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). Beginning this past spring continuing through March 2018 Lutter will undertake an ambitious project documenting not only exterior views of the buildings on LACMA’s campus that are slated for demolition to make room for a new building for the museum’s permanent collection but also the interiors of selected galleries to create images that follow in the grand tradition of 19th-century “gallery paintings” of museum interiors.

Artist Vera Lutter in her studio at LACMA, with CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director Michael Govan. Image courtesy of LACMA.

Artist Vera Lutter in her studio at LACMA, with CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director Michael Govan. Image courtesy of LACMA.

Image courtesy of Vera Lutter.

Image courtesy of Vera Lutter.

Lutter makes large-scale photographs using one of the oldest optical technologies still in use, that of the camera obscura. This will be the first time she has trained her technique on two-dimensional objects, which in the end will require nine months of exposure to craft her images culminating in an exhibition in fall 2018. For more details on her collaboration with LACMA, please click here.