Current Student

Strange World: Photographs by Wen Han Chang

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Current MFA Photo/Video student Wen Han Chang is showing photographs from his project "Strange World" from October 11- January 30, 2019 at the Griffin Museum of Photography. A reception will be held January 30, 2019 from 6:30-8pm.

The following is an excerpt from Chang's artists statement: "No one can be exempted from the need of sleep. In sleep, we are restored and refreshed while suspending between bodily functions and consciousness. We do not know what was happening when lying asleep. Further, those almost in trance are cut off from the reality.

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The camera lens was set up to focus on the surroundings such as ceilings, walls, and corners of my room. The shutter of camera would take pictures when I was not awake. When my perception was limited and cut off from the usual, the camera started to see, to reveal the world I never saw.

Every day and every night several kinds of light, came from the street-lamps, headlights and so on, went through the windows and reflected around. Rays of light implied that something travelled through time and space. The light caught by my camera left a stroke, a layer on the film. In other words, something or someone passed by, but their traces entered my room, being recorded by my camera."

Wen-Han Chang was born in Kaohsiung, a southern city of Taiwan, in 1982. His journey into photography began in university. While doing his BS in physics, he studied light, and was fascinated with laser photography and optics. After a career in medical photography, Wen Han moved to New York in 2017 to pursue his MFA in Photo/Video at School of Visual Arts, where he currently studies.

New York Times article featuring photographs by Hannah Ryan

This month, current MFA Photo/Video student Hannah Ryan's photographs are featured in the New York Times article "Why You Can’t Stop Looking at Other People’s Screens."

Ryan’s work “Subway Hands” as featured in NYT

Ryan’s work “Subway Hands” as featured in NYT

As the article asserts: "Other people’s screens are everywhere, once you start to notice them. They’re collectively most obvious at night, as they bob through the city, creating a new, hand-height layer to the ambient lights, or when held up at concerts, like lighters. During the day, other people’s screens hover around us as we wait in line for coffee, or as we sit and drink our coffee, or as we take our coffee on the bus or train.

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Other people’s screens are windows into their lives, and brains, and relationships and work — into their politics, anxieties, failures and addictions."

Ryan's photographs offer a voyeuristic look at the hand-held screens of strangers and are a fitting compliment to the Times article's discussion on "shoulder-surfing"-- a term used to describe glancing at the screens of passerby.

Ryan's photographs are part of her ongoing project titled "Subway Hands," which has garnered a wide following on Instagram. To view more of Ryan's work, visit her feed (@subwayhands on Instagram).

To read the full New York Times article with Ryan's images, follow this link.

Spring Salon 2018 Recap

Now that the dust has settled we wanted to take a moment to recap the events of Salon and acknowledge the efforts of our talented student body. This Spring's event was a major success on all accords as the 3 hours were filled with installations galore, compelling film screenings, large then life art, engaging photographic work, and even a video game. We also wanted to extend a thank you to everyone that came through, your presence was most appreciated.

So please, enjoy our recap to get a glimpse at what's transpired, and what our creative student body is up to. If you missed this event, don't worry there will be another one in the Fall!

Design by Johnnie Chatman

Design by Johnnie Chatman

I. Preparation

Hanwen Zhang  (class of 2019) setting up his work. 

Hanwen Zhang (class of 2019) setting up his work. 

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Thesis student  Alison Gootee  setting up her large format prints. 

Thesis student Alison Gootee setting up her large format prints. 

Paul Simon  (class of 2019) helping  Jonathan Ellis  (class of 2019) set up his display. 

Paul Simon (class of 2019) helping Jonathan Ellis (class of 2019) set up his display. 

II. Payoff

Video installation by  Jordan Cruz . 

Video installation by Jordan Cruz

Jordan Cruz  (class of 2019) explaining her work to guests. 

Jordan Cruz (class of 2019) explaining her work to guests. 

Xueqing Yin  (class of 2019) playing with Yangzi Huang's (class of 2020) video game piece. 

Xueqing Yin (class of 2019) playing with Yangzi Huang's (class of 2020) video game piece. 

Works by  Serichai Traipoom  (class of 2019)

Works by Serichai Traipoom (class of 2019)

Petros Lales  (class of 2019) in front of his ongoing body of work, Feme_1.

Petros Lales (class of 2019) in front of his ongoing body of work, Feme_1.

video works by  Jeong Hur  (class of 2020).

video works by Jeong Hur (class of 2020).

Yi Hsuan Lai (class of 2020) in front of a collection of her current works. 

Yi Hsuan Lai (class of 2020) in front of a collection of her current works. 

Youwon Jeong (class of 2018) with faculty member Ed Bowes, standing besides still from her thesis film. 

Youwon Jeong (class of 2018) with faculty member Ed Bowes, standing besides still from her thesis film. 

Chris Callis (faculty) observing the works of Wen Han Chang (class of 2020).

Chris Callis (faculty) observing the works of Wen Han Chang (class of 2020).

Guests observing video work by Raquel Salazar (class of 2019).

Guests observing video work by Raquel Salazar (class of 2019).

installation piece by  Johnnie Chatman  (class of 2018)

installation piece by Johnnie Chatman (class of 2018)

Lucea Spinelli  (class of 2019) and classmates enjoying the 3d work of  Jing Lin  (class of 2018)

Lucea Spinelli (class of 2019) and classmates enjoying the 3d work of Jing Lin (class of 2018)

Wen Han Chang  (class of 2020) and guest beside his work. 

Wen Han Chang (class of 2020) and guest beside his work. 

guests observing the work of  Brianna Calello  (class of 2019). 

guests observing the work of Brianna Calello (class of 2019). 

Chair, Charles Traub with student  Tooraj Khamenehzadeh  (class of 2019) and partner. 

Chair, Charles Traub with student Tooraj Khamenehzadeh (class of 2019) and partner. 

Works by Yoon Ji Nam (class of 2019). 

Works by Yoon Ji Nam (class of 2019). 

Nina Cochran (class of 2020) standing beside her photographic works.

Nina Cochran (class of 2020) standing beside her photographic works.

work by  Lucea Spinelli  (class of 2019).

work by Lucea Spinelli (class of 2019).

Guests watching checking out  Rebecca Krasnik 's (class of 2018) video installation piece. 

Guests watching checking out Rebecca Krasnik's (class of 2018) video installation piece. 

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installation work by  Livia Di Lucia  (class of 2019).

installation work by Livia Di Lucia (class of 2019).

works by  Christopher Janaro  (class of 2018)

works by Christopher Janaro (class of 2018)

Class of 2018 students (From left to right):   Jing Lin ,  Lishan Liu ,  Dodo Xinyu Zhang  and Youwon Jeong standing beside an image from  Dodo Xinyu Zhang 's thesis. 

Class of 2018 students (From left to right):  Jing LinLishan LiuDodo Xinyu Zhang and Youwon Jeong standing beside an image from Dodo Xinyu Zhang's thesis. 

images courtesy of Wen Han Chang, Livia Di Lucia, Christopher Janaro, Johnnie Chatman and Youwon Jeong. 

images courtesy of Wen Han Chang, Livia Di Lucia, Christopher Janaro, Johnnie Chatman and Youwon Jeong. 

The department extends its gratitude and thanks to everyone who made this event such a success and we hope to see you again in the summer for the 2018 thesis exhibition and in the fall for the next Salon!

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2018 SVA Alumni Scholarship

Congratulations to Julianne Nash and Johnnie Chatman for being selected as recipients of the Alumni Scholarships Awards; and to Naixin Xu for the Thomas Reiss Memorial Award. Reviewed and rated by an alumni panel, the Alumni Society Board of Directors awards aid to the completion of final projects. The Society manages 26 annual scholarships that provide merit based support earmarked for specific academic programs and need based support. The assortment of scholarships allows the Society to provide assistance across majors, programs and class years -- touching more students lives every year. The Society’s flagship scholarship program is the annual Alumni Scholarship Awards program. In 2017, 78 projects were funded a total of $83,400.

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Agglomeration, by Julianne Nash, is at once an immensely personal project in regards to loss, trauma, and personal mortality; while at the same time references the breakdown of human and logarithmic computer vision. Within this series I contend with my fears of inheriting a degenerative form of vision loss by utilizing computerized image stacking algorithms to create digitally manipulated images that are difficult to visually comprehend. I intentionally confuse the patterns that the computer relies on to create a cohesive image by using tools made to blend images based on similarities to force them to blend on differences thus causing the computer to fail in the manner in which it is “supposed” to see.

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 I Forgot Where We Were; is here, by Johnnie Chatman, acts a meeting place for two bodies of work, I Forgot Where We Were… and where we were is here. Together the elements within the series use constructs and idioms of the West and western landscape photography as allegorical elements to facilitate a conversation on black identity as it reconfigures itself against media, historical, and transglobal narratives. The work opens up a dialogue on selfhood and place through the creation of an ambiguous space where a seemingly romantic fascination is met with a critical examination of the past and present through representations of history, time and the landscape.

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Naixin Xu is the recipient of the Thomas Reiss Memorial Award Fund which was established in 2003 in memory of Thomas Reiss (MFA 1993 Photography and Related Media) by his brother, Richard M. Reiss. An avid environmentalist, Tom passed away in August 2002 in a boating accident in Thailand. This annual award is designated to support a thesis project by a final-year MFA Photography, Video and Related Media major whose project addresses a humanitarian issue.


The Westbound Journey (working title) is an 1-1.5 hour long observational and photographic non-narrative film, focusing on a cross-country journey of commodities, which are transported to Tibet by a truck driver, from a small trade city in southeast China to Tibet. The aim is to present, from an observer’s view, a fluid subtle status of the culture itself, struggling between the old and the new. 

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SVA Alumni Society, Inc. is an independent non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation which works to provide support for SVA’s most promising students.The Society works in conjunction with the Alumni Affairs and Development office at the School of Visual Arts serving as the vehicle for granting student scholarships and soliciting donations to fund the scholarships. Due to support from the School of Visual Arts, 100% of all donations to the Alumni Society go directly to the education and financial needs of current SVA students.

Fall Salon 2017 Recap

Now that the dust has settled we wanted to recap the events of Salon and thank everyone who participated, from the students to the distinguished alumni and faculty who contributed to the Charity Print Sale.

This fall's event was a major success. With an estimated 350+ guests in attendance over the 3 hours that were filled with performances, film screenings, video installations, photographic work, food and lots of conversation on art and life.

So take a look below and get a glimpse at what's transpired, and what are talented student body is up to. If you missed this event, don't worry there will be another one in the spring which promises to be one not to miss.

 
Design by Johnnie Chatman

Design by Johnnie Chatman

 

I. The Preparation

Jaizi Abedania setting up her work for her first Salon

Jaizi Abedania setting up her work for her first Salon

Thesis student, Zack Boozer placing some finishing touches on his display.

Thesis student, Zack Boozer placing some finishing touches on his display.

Hanwen Zhang and Nina Cochran discussing last minute placement.

Hanwen Zhang and Nina Cochran discussing last minute placement.

Wen Han Chang and Brett Henrikson cutting some posters for the print sale.

Wen Han Chang and Brett Henrikson cutting some posters for the print sale.

Zhazha Zheng and Yi Chen setting up their interactive video installation.

Zhazha Zheng and Yi Chen setting up their interactive video installation.

Returning student Di Wu setting up her mixed media works. 

Returning student Di Wu setting up her mixed media works. 

Can't have a salon without snacks. 

Can't have a salon without snacks. 

 

II. The Payoff

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Guest enjoying returning student Carla Carvalho's installation based on her time in Brazil.

Guest enjoying returning student Carla Carvalho's installation based on her time in Brazil.

Guests playing with Jing Lin's bubble machine. 

Guests playing with Jing Lin's bubble machine. 

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A glimpse at the film screening. 

A glimpse at the film screening. 

Guests glancing over the work in the print sale. 

Guests glancing over the work in the print sale. 

Inside thesis student Dodo Zhang's glamourous pink tent "recruitment" event. 

Inside thesis student Dodo Zhang's glamourous pink tent "recruitment" event. 

Guests viewing thesis student Youwon Jeong's work  Heart Street.  

Guests viewing thesis student Youwon Jeong's work Heart Street. 

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New student Angie Nam discussing her work. 

New student Angie Nam discussing her work. 

New student Petros Lales in front of his image,  Time Traveler .

New student Petros Lales in front of his image, Time Traveler.

New student, Yi Hsuan Lai beside her work.

New student, Yi Hsuan Lai beside her work.

Performance by thesis student Taole Zhu. 

Performance by thesis student Taole Zhu. 

Installation by new student Kyle Henderson. 

Installation by new student Kyle Henderson. 

Photos courtesy of Chris Janaro, Petros Lales and Youwon Jeong. 

Photos courtesy of Chris Janaro, Petros Lales and Youwon Jeong. 

The department extends its gratitude and thanks to everyone who made this event such a success and we hope to see you again in the spring!

Current Student Johnnie Chatman featured in Francis Ford Coppola's magazine Zoetrope

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Fall guest designer and photographer Richard Misrach has curated a selection of images from  Johnnie Chatman's upcoming thesis project, "I Forgot Where We Were..." into the upcoming Fall 2017 issue of Zoetrope magazine. The feature will showcase a series of his self portraits, where he uses constructs and idioms of the West and western landscape photography as allegorical elements to conduct a dialogue about black identity as it reconfigures itself against media, historical, and transglobal narratives.

Be sure to check out the Notes on Design section to read more on why Richard Misrach chose to include this work in the upcoming issue.



 

Images courtesy of Johnnie Chatman. 

Images courtesy of Johnnie Chatman. 

For those in the San Francisco area, alongside fellow contributing artist Wesaam Al-Badry,  Johnnie Chatman will be participating in a dialogue with Richard Misrach at the release party on Wednesday Nov. 1st. The gathering will being hosted at Cafe Zoetrope in North Beach from 6-8 pm. It will be a delightful evening of literature and art, and of course plenty of food and wine.

For more details on the event and to rsvp, please click here. 

 

Image Courtesy of Zoetrope. 

Image Courtesy of Zoetrope. 

Zoetrope: All-Story is an American literary magazine that was launched in 1997 by Francis Ford Coppola and Adrienne Brodeur. All-Story intends to publish new short-fiction. Zoetrope: All-Story recently received the National Magazine Award for Fiction, the highest honor due an American periodical, for Anthony Marra's story "The Grozny Tourist Bureau.". With each issue a guest artist is chosen to construct the quarterly’s issues art directions. Past designers have included Agnes Varda, David Bowie, Gus Van Saint, Helmut Newton, Olafur Eliasson, Mickalene Thomas, Ryan McGinness, Martin Parr, John Baldessari and a plethora of creatives across mediums.  

To purchase your copy and find out more about the upcoming issue, please click here.

Alum Netta Laufer and current student Daqi Fang, in the inaugural exhibition of New York Photography Diary

New York Photography Diary is pleased to host its inaugural exhibition, Elsewhere is a Negative Mirror, at Carmel by the Green in East London. This exhibition follows The Physical Fabric of Cities—organized by London Photography Diary—and is the second in a year-long program of shows being organized by The Photography Diaries. Elsewhere is a Negative Mirror is curated by New York Photography Diary editors Daniel Pateman and Will Fenstermaker and assisted by Ivana D’Accico.

©Daqi Fang  Plastic Utopia II #2  , from “Plastic Utopia II” 

©Daqi Fang Plastic Utopia II #2, from “Plastic Utopia II” 

Inspired by the shock of Brexit in Britain and corresponding xenophobic, nativist tones in US and European politics, Elsewhere is a Negative Mirror features the work of eight international artists who responded to the set theme of Borders. Each photographer explores boundaries in the midst of a reconfiguration, provoking a reconciliation with the limits at which one defines identity, homeland, and ontological frameworks.

The exhibition title comes from a dialogue between the Venetian merchant Marco Polo and Mongol Emperor Kublai Khan in Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities (1972) and speaks to the way communities define themselves in opposition to other people. Polo, an exile—albeit a voluntary one—tells Kublai of a peculiar sensation: the recognition of oneself in the otherness of those who live beyond the border. Coming upon daily life within an unfamiliar city, Polo recounts that “the traveler finds again a past of his that he did not know he had: the foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.”

To this, Kublai responds that travel brings one into contact with one’s past, one’s possible futures, and all the presents that could have been. “Elsewhere is a negative mirror,” Polo says. “The traveler recognizes the little that is his, discovering much he has not had and will never have.”

These photographs, like negative mirrors, show what is familiar in unfamiliar places. In them, one finds home in a world that has been divided into parts—conquered, nationalized, and quantified—its distinctions marked by thresholds that have only the illusion of inviolability.

©Netta Laufer  Dog, كلب, כלב  , from “25FT” 

©Netta Laufer Dog, كلب, כלב, from “25FT” 

“Elsewhere Is a Negative Mirror” will run from October 6th to December 6th, 2016 at Carmel by the Green, next to Bethnal Green tube station in East London.

Opening on October 6th from 6–9pm