New York Times

Jamie Permuth's coverage of "Olmedini" featured in the New York Times

Alumni Jaime Permuth never forgot the day 20 years ago when he met Olmedo Renteria on the subway. How could he? With his tuxedo, red shirt and courtly manner, Mr. Renteria cut quite a figure among the weary commuters. But after that first encounter, he disappeared, which is not unusual.

After decades of performing on television in Ecuador, renowned magician Olmedo Renteria — aka Olmedini El Mago — arrived in New York to showcase his talents to audiences commuting on the city’s subways.

Olmedini stopping for a slice of pizza after a visit to Tannen’s Magic Shop on 34th Street. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini stopping for a slice of pizza after a visit to Tannen’s Magic Shop on 34th Street. credit: Jaime Permuth

Mr. Permuth, a Guatemalan photographer in New York, was smitten. He set out to find the magician, whom he located through social media. “Is this Olmedini?” he asked when they met face to face. “He was quiet and then said, ‘At your service.’ It was such an old-fashioned voice coming from another place and time.”

Permuth set out to document the world of Renteria and his images were recently published in the New York Times. What follows are some selected images from the full article.

Olmedini holding props in his apartment. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini holding props in his apartment. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini, dressed in his magician gear, waiting for a train to perform. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini, dressed in his magician gear, waiting for a train to perform. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini lives in a housing complex for the disabled in East Harlem. His doves Lluvia (Rain) and Sol (Sun) are his constant companions. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini lives in a housing complex for the disabled in East Harlem. His doves Lluvia (Rain) and Sol (Sun) are his constant companions. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini strumming a guitar in his apartment in a housing complex for the disabled in East Harlem. credit: Jaime Permuth

Olmedini strumming a guitar in his apartment in a housing complex for the disabled in East Harlem. credit: Jaime Permuth

A “transmutation trick” by Olemdini. credit: Jaime Permuth

A “transmutation trick” by Olemdini. credit: Jaime Permuth

Jaime Permuth is a Guatemalan photographer living and working in New York City.

His photographs have been shown at several venues in New York City, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Queens Museum of Art, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, The Museum of the City of New York, The Jewish Museum, El Museo del Barrio, and The Brooklyn Museum of Art. He has also exhibited internationally at the Museo Nacional de Arte Moderno in Guatemala, Ryugaheon Gallery (Korea) Casa del Lago in Mexico City, and the Israeli Parliament.  Among others, his work is included in the collections of The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Museo Nacional de Arte Moderno Guatemala, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Museum of the City of New York, El Museo del Barrio, Yeshiva University Museum, State University of New York New Paltz, Art Museum of the Americas (DC), Fullerton Art Museum (CA) Museum of Art Ft. Lauderdale (FLA) and Fondazione Benetton.

"I Can Help Who's Next:" alumni Natan Dvir's work featured in New York Times

MFA Photo/Video alumni Natan Dvir, who moved to New York from Israel in 2008, is featured the New York Times for his photo essay on queues around the city. As the featured article states, Dvir "was waiting amid a crowd at a bus stop, and when the bus pulled up, everyone magically took positions in line, as if they had choreographed it in advance."

Dvir goes on to add: “That sounds normal, right?” he said. “Not in Israel. In Israel, everybody would rush to the bus door. It’s survival of the fittest. I found it so shocking that I almost missed the bus. How did everybody know where to stand? In most of the world, that doesn’t happen.”

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For his work, Dvir "found lines at bus stations, restaurants, bathrooms and outside boutiques offering limited-edition sneakers, where posting photos of the line on Instagram was half the fun. Lines were subcultures unto themselves. The lines in Midtown Manhattan were different from those in Flushing, Queens; the lines for Cronuts were different from those outside the Human Resources Administration.

“People stand in line because it’s cool, or because they’re part of a community,” Dvir said. “Being in the line is a huge part of the experience, if not the main part of the experience.”

Natan Dvir is a photographer who focuses on the human aspects of cultural, social and political issues. He received his MBA from Tel Aviv University and his MFA in Photography from the School of Visual Arts (NY), after which he became an adjunct faculty member at the International Center of Photography (ICP). Based in New York he photographs around the world represented by Polaris Images photo agency and Anastasia Photo gallery.

To view the article in its entirety, visit the New York Times' website. To see more of Natan Dvir's work, please follow the link provided.

New York Times article featuring photographs by Hannah Ryan

This month, current MFA Photo/Video student Hannah Ryan's photographs are featured in the New York Times article "Why You Can’t Stop Looking at Other People’s Screens."

Ryan’s work “Subway Hands” as featured in NYT

Ryan’s work “Subway Hands” as featured in NYT

As the article asserts: "Other people’s screens are everywhere, once you start to notice them. They’re collectively most obvious at night, as they bob through the city, creating a new, hand-height layer to the ambient lights, or when held up at concerts, like lighters. During the day, other people’s screens hover around us as we wait in line for coffee, or as we sit and drink our coffee, or as we take our coffee on the bus or train.

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Other people’s screens are windows into their lives, and brains, and relationships and work — into their politics, anxieties, failures and addictions."

Ryan's photographs offer a voyeuristic look at the hand-held screens of strangers and are a fitting compliment to the Times article's discussion on "shoulder-surfing"-- a term used to describe glancing at the screens of passerby.

Ryan's photographs are part of her ongoing project titled "Subway Hands," which has garnered a wide following on Instagram. To view more of Ryan's work, visit her feed (@subwayhands on Instagram).

To read the full New York Times article with Ryan's images, follow this link.

Alum, Maureen Drennan featured New York Times

Alum Maureen Drennan latest work on the Rust Belt was featured in an article in The New York Times. In the interview with John Leland, Drennan opens up about her motivations behind the project as well as the insight that came as she delve deeper into the Rust Belt.

Bath Beach.

Bath Beach.

Excerpt from the article

“You have ideas about a project,” said Maureen Drennan, “but then when you go out there and shoot, things change.”

The idea for the photographs shown here, Ms. Drennan said, was to document the Rust Belt of New York City: an industrial wasteland that would stand as “a microcosm of the larger Rust Belt of the Midwest,” where once-vital factories gave way to hulking wreckage and the anger that animated the 2016 presidential election.

To read the full interview, please click here.

Sunset Park.

Sunset Park.

Maureen Drennan is a photographer born and based in New York City. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC, the Tacoma Art Museum Seattle, Washington, the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Aperture, Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Colorado Photographic Arts Center, and the Newspace Center for Photography, amongst others. Her images have been featured in The New Yorker, The New York Times, California Sunday Magazine, Huffington Post, Photograph Magazine, Photo District News, American Photo, UK Telegraph, Refinery 29, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project.

She currently teaches at LaGuardia Community College and the International Center for Photography in New York City.

Bath Beach.

Bath Beach.

Alums, Dina Litovsky and Ryan Pfulger featured in New York Times

In an article about the high-drama world of youth competition dance, written by Lizzie Feidelson, graduate of the program Dina Litovsky provides the accompanying visuals for the narrative.

Prestige dancers performing “To Build a Home” at the Showbiz competition in Hackensack, N.J.

Prestige dancers performing “To Build a Home” at the Showbiz competition in Hackensack, N.J.

Excerpt from story: "The second time I met Angelina Velardi she had just lost a baby tooth. It left a gaping hole in her smile, but she liked how it looked: “Now if I show the judges I’m mature, they’ll be more impressed,” she said, happily. Angelina is a 12-year-old competitive dancer, and canny to the ways in which technical acuity and preadolescent pliability can be combined to her advantage. She started competitive dancing less than three years ago.

On a Friday afternoon last spring, Angelina and her teammates from Prestige Academy of Dance arrived at a technical high school in Sparta, N.J., for the Imagine National Dance Challenge, a children’s dance competition. Each girl wore her black uniform and sported the team hairstyle, a low bun gleaming with hair spray. Dina Crupi, Prestige Academy’s 25-year-old studio owner and competition-team director, had chosen the hairstyle for its versatility: It allowed various headpieces and hats to be put on and removed with ease. Crupi still had nightmares about last year’s style, a too-complex choice involving a pouf encircled by braids. While she stood sipping coffee, the girls warmed up around her, brushing their fingers against the athletic-gray lobby walls for balance. With their small heads, shellacked scalps and long necks, the teammates looked elegant and creaturely, like a row of lizards."

To see more of Dina Litovsky's images and to continuing reading the full article, please click here.

Prestige dancers rehearsing before a competition. From left: Annalise Hofman, 13; Velardi; and Tiffany Benevenga, 13. Images courtesy of Dina Litovsky. 

Prestige dancers rehearsing before a competition. From left: Annalise Hofman, 13; Velardi; and Tiffany Benevenga, 13. Images courtesy of Dina Litovsky. 


Concurrently, alumni Ryan Pfluger was tasked with photographing human rights lawyer Alka Pradhan in a story (written by Jeffrey E. Stern) about her work with a high profile client, one of five accused Sept. 11 plotters imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay.

Excerpt from story : "When Pradhan flies down to Gitmo, which she does every month or two, her conversations with her client often have less to do with proving his innocence than with what has happened to him since his suspected crimes. One of the first things she learned about Baluchi, before they met, was that the C.I.A. had tortured him, and she has come to believe that America has waterboarded away its ability to convict him. It’s an international norm that countries don’t execute people they have tortured; the Geneva Conventions go as far as to say such prisoners must be rehabilitated. If America executes Baluchi, Pradhan believes, it will cede whatever eroding toehold it has on a moral high ground. Beyond that, what concerns her is that her client is suffering; that he has real physical and psychological injuries from his torture that have yet to be addressed. The way she sees it, by denying him adequate treatment, the government has continued to torture him."

To continuing reading the full story, please click here. 

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An Artist and Her 'Beautiful Boy' by Alum, Lissa Rivera

In their intimate portraits, the photographer Lissa Rivera and her partner, BJ Lillis, are building their own fantasy world. The body of work has recently been featured in The New York Times, Harper's Bazaar, Creators (VICE), Forbes, Artnet, and Photo District News.

There will be an opening of 'Beautiful Boy' on June 1 from 6-8pm at ClampArt. Exhibition and upcoming event details below.

EXHIBITION Lissa Rivera: Beautiful Boy June 1- July 15, 2017 Reception: June 1, 2017, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. ClampArt, 247 West 29th Street, NYC

ARTIST TALK Lissa Rivera with BJ Lillis Saturday, June 10, 2017, 3:00 p.m. ClampArt, 247 West 29th Street, NYC

LECTURE Beautiful Boy: Artist Lissa Rivera and Muse BJ Lillis in Dialogue June 22, 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. New York Public Library, Mid-Manhattan Library, 6th Floor

Lissa Rivera, left, and BJ Lillis in two early test images. Credit Courtesy of the artist and ClampArt, New York

Lissa Rivera, left, and BJ Lillis in two early test images. Credit Courtesy of the artist and ClampArt, New York

On a long subway ride three years ago, BJ Lillis decided to share something with his friend and co-worker, Lissa Rivera. Mr. Lillis, who describes himself as genderqueer, told her that he had spent most of his college years dressing, full-time, in women’s clothing.

But in the professional world, he’d lost his confidence. To help him regain it, she offered to take his photograph.

Mr. Lillis had never really seen himself, dressed as he wished, in a carefully made portrait.

“So much of identity is constructed from looking at pictures,” Ms. Rivera said in a recent interview. “Looking at photographs and looking at a film can really change who you are.”

The two have made dozens of images since, in a project called “Beautiful Boy.” An exhibition of the same name opens June 1 at the ClampArt gallery in Chelsea. 

For the full NYT article, please visit the site

Rethinking how science is seen by Marvin Heiferman on NYT LENS Blog

Photography and science continually reimagine each other. Yet science photography — for all its impact and range — is a surprisingly underexamined field. That deficit led me to develop “Seeing Science: Photography, Science and Visual Culture.” Sponsored by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and its Center for Art Design and Visual Culture, the project tracks how science and photography work in tandem.

The symbiotic relationship of photography and the sciences has sparked epiphanies, controversies and paradigm shifts for nearly two centuries. The term “scientist” was first used in 1834, the word “photography” was introduced just five years later, and the two observational disciplines have been intertwined ever since.

The British-made ICL 7500 series from the 1970s included terminals and workstations designed for office use, and by the 1980s, to play games such as Pac-Man and Space Invaders.Credit James Ball/Docubyte

The British-made ICL 7500 series from the 1970s included terminals and workstations designed for office use, and by the 1980s, to play games such as Pac-Man and Space Invaders.Credit James Ball/Docubyte

For the full article, please visit the New York Times LENS blog site