photobooks

Fall Salon 2018 Recap

This year's Fall Salon was a great success and we are so pleased to share some highlights with you. Included among the stellar photographic works were several large-scale installations, a screening of short films, works in interactive video, sculptural elements, sound experiments, and performances.

If you missed us this Fall, be sure to stop by in the Spring for what is sure to be another successful event. In the meantime, enjoy the following recap of our 2018 Fall Salon!

I. Preparation

Kyle Henderson  installing his work.

Kyle Henderson installing his work.

All set up and ready for the evening!

All set up and ready for the evening!

Snacks aplenty.

Snacks aplenty.

 

II. The Main Event

Thesis students  Paul Simon  and Kyle Henderson discuss Simon’s work.

Thesis students Paul Simon and Kyle Henderson discuss Simon’s work.

Wanki Min  standing beside a consortium of work from his ongoing series.

Wanki Min standing beside a consortium of work from his ongoing series.

Heather Olker  and guest enjoying her first Fall Salon.

Heather Olker and guest enjoying her first Fall Salon.

Installation view of  Brianna Calello ’s work.

Installation view of Brianna Calello’s work.

Po Han Huang explores photography through the use of social media.

Po Han Huang explores photography through the use of social media.

Sara Arno  takes a break with her work.

Sara Arno takes a break with her work.

Petros Lales  presents his 3D modeled organelles to a fellow student.

Petros Lales presents his 3D modeled organelles to a fellow student.

Explorations from Joshua Spector

Explorations from Joshua Spector

Beautiful sculptural works by thesis student  Kyle Henderson

Beautiful sculptural works by thesis student Kyle Henderson

 
New student  Terrance Purdy  and friends with his selection of portraiture works.

New student Terrance Purdy and friends with his selection of portraiture works.

Book mockup from thesis student Angie Yoon Ji Nam

Book mockup from thesis student Angie Yoon Ji Nam

Thesis student  Brett Henrikson  with textiles based on his images.

Thesis student Brett Henrikson with textiles based on his images.

New student,  Hyemi Kim , poses for the camera.

New student, Hyemi Kim, poses for the camera.

A guest gazes at the works of thesis student David Cade.

A guest gazes at the works of thesis student David Cade.

 
Yi Hsuan Lai  with her installation at Fall Salon. Details below.

Yi Hsuan Lai with her installation at Fall Salon. Details below.

Thesis student Collin  Xueqing Yin  mimics the subject of display.

Thesis student Collin Xueqing Yin mimics the subject of display.

New student,  Fernando Sancho  and guest

New student, Fernando Sancho and guest

 
Jonathan Ellis  beside his stunning landscapes.

Jonathan Ellis beside his stunning landscapes.

Yeshan Zhang beside her documentary portraiture.

Yeshan Zhang beside her documentary portraiture.

Many thanks to everyone who came by and lent their time and support to our talented student body. Your presence and engaging conversations was much appreciated and added to the success of our 2018 Fall Salon. We hope to see you again in the Spring for another edition of MFA Photo, Video, & Related Media’s Salon!

 
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Amani Willett and The Disappearance of Joseph Plummer

All images courtesy of Amani Willett and Overlapse. 

All images courtesy of Amani Willett and Overlapse. 

A curious tale spun from the life of mysterious hermit Joseph Plummer, who lived in the woods of central New Hampshire in the late 1700s. Two centuries later an unsuspecting man purchased the mythical loner’s land and built a hideaway cabin for himself – only to discover the legend of Joseph lurking deep in the seclusion of the forest. This atmospheric photobook explores our human desire to escape and find peaceful solitude, far from the burdens and apparatus of modern society.

Exploring themes of history, place and mythology, alumni Amani Willett’s photographs track the hermit’s overgrown trail through the land his family now owns. Willett’s father, unaware of the reclusive man who roamed the area nearly 200 years before him, acquired the deed 40 years ago with the intention of establishing a rustic retreat.

Upon learning of Plummer’s existence, Willett endeavoured to photograph a fragmented narrative amidst the same landscape he once inhabited. He scoured local archives to find first-hand written accounts describing the hermit’s character, as well as bona fide personal effects which appear in the book. Adding to the visual journey are historical portrait and landscape images from the region that inspired Willett’s physical intervention in the form of destructive applique and collage.

The resulting work mirrors the past while keeping Plummer’s unknowable history intact. It also reveals how the hermit’s existence still resonates today – not only as a constant counterpoint to our fast-paced, technology-driven times – but in conjuring the same romanticised allure that tempts new generations to also venture off-grid.

With a release this fall, the book is available for preorder through independent visual arts and photobooks publisher, Overlapse. Please click here for more details and to reserve your copy.

All That Paradise Allows by Adam Bell on the Aperture Blog

reviews July 18th, 2017

All That Paradise Allows

In Crimea and the Caribbean, Nicholas Muellner’s new photobook is a tropical gothic of seduction and violence.

By Adam Bell

Nicholas Muellner,  Untitled , from  In Most Tides an Island , 2017 Courtesy the artist

Nicholas Muellner, Untitled, from In Most Tides an Island, 2017
Courtesy the artist

Gracefully marrying image and text, Nicholas Muellner’s photobook In Most Tides an Island(2017) is a poignant meditation on loneliness, love, and isolation in our contemporary world. Structured in twelve chapters, the book tells two parallel but related stories: the real-life struggles of closeted, gay men in provincial Russia and Ukraine, yearning for a connection and love they can’t openly express; and the invented life of a solitary woman on a Caribbean island. Equal parts document, diary, and fictional invention, In Most Tides an Island defies easy categorization. Like Muellner’s previous books—The Amnesia Pavilions (2011) and The Photograph Commands Indifference (2009)—the work deftly combines image and text into a unique form, while, at the same time, poetically questioning the limits of each. The book’s parallel stories ultimately converge to offer a portrait of the heartrending reality of our disconnected, yet networked lives.

Nicholas Muellner,  Untitled , from  In Most Tides an Island , 2017 Courtesy the artist

Nicholas Muellner, Untitled, from In Most Tides an Island, 2017
Courtesy the artist

Adam Bell: You describe yourself as an artist who “operates at the intersection of photography and writing.” How did you come to this relationship and how do you see it working in In Most Tides an Island?

Nicholas Muellner: I came to that intersection in my work by way of a circle: it’s precisely where I started. Long before I knew myself as an artist, I loved following threads of language, and I loved making pictures. They were better places to live than inside myself—richer, safer, more satisfying. Simultaneously, and for as long as I can remember, I have been both thrilled and heartbroken by the inviolable separateness of each human consciousness, no matter the physical or emotional proximity. For me, these facts were inseparable. Words and images became like two lovers lying next to each other in bed who can never know the other’s mind. And, at some point, without a formal declaration, I made it my life’s work—what an absurd claim!—to reconcile those two fraught lovers, by making a romance of the space between them.

That’s a lie. My work never hopes to reconcile language and image. More accurately, it deploys their unbridgeable autonomies as both a means and a metaphor. In the new book, the reticence and stillness of the photographs often amplifies the loneliness and repression of the written narratives. Other times, the emotion of an image confesses what cannot be expressed in words. The language and the photographs collapse into disjunctive double exposures and create a broken double vision, moving in and out of sensory alignment.

For the full review and text, please visit the Aperture Blog here